The Works of Galileo

Galileo's Later Years

Final Notes

In 1634, only one year after Galileo’s trial, Sister Maria Celeste died at the Convent of San Mateo near Arcetri. In 1637, Galileo lost sight in both eyes (due to glaucoma and inflammation, not from observing the Sun). In September of 1638, Galileo was visited by John Milton, who looked through his telescope and later mentioned it in Paradise Lost (V, 262).

This is the Church of Santa Croce, in Florence: (Figure 1) . When Galileo died on Jan 8, 1642, his will directed that his remains should be placed beside those of his father Vincenzio within this church. To avoid attracting too much attention from Rome, Galileo’s remains were laid to rest in an obscure corner of an obscure room in this church (Figure 2) . The Grand Duke and other Florentine dignitaries did not attend. In 1737, as Florentines began to recognize his fame, he was reburied with much ceremony in the mausoleum in the north aisle of the church, the pantheon of Florence (Figure 3) (Figure 4) . Nearby are tombs of Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Rossini, and many others.

In the year Galileo died, Newton was born, and Galileo’s form of mathematical physics lives on today, from the University of Oklahoma Physics/Astronomy Department to Fermilab National Accelerator near Chicago. (Figure 5)

Exhibit revised 11/17/04.

Figure 1 Figure 1 - Return to Text

Santa Croce, Florence.

Image credit: Duane H. D. Roller slide archive
Zoom - 5 in | 10 in
Download TIFF (large file)
Figure 2 Figure 2 - Return to Text

Santa Croce, Florence, interior.

Image credit: Duane H. D. Roller slide archive
Zoom - 5 in | 10 in
Download TIFF (large file)
Figure 3 Figure 3 - Return to Text

Santa Croce, Florence. Galileo’s tomb.

Image credit: Duane H. D. Roller slide archive
Zoom - 5 in | 10 in
Download TIFF (large file)
Figure 4 Figure 4 - Return to Text

Galileo’s tomb.

Image credit: Duane H. D. Roller slide archive
Zoom - 5 in | 10 in
Download TIFF (large file)
Figure 5 Figure 5 - Return to Text

Mathematical physics.

Zoom - 5 in | 10 in
Download TIFF (large file)

Exhibit credit: Kerry Magruder, with the assistance of , Marilyn B. Ogilvie, Duane H. D. Roller.

Exhibit Links
Web Links
Downloads
Endorsements

These teaching resources provided by the History of Science Department at the University of Oklahoma.

Unless otherwise indicated, all images courtesy History of Science Collections, University of Oklahoma Libraries. Image Terms of Use.

OU LogoOU College of Arts and Sciences Online Logo

OU Disclaimer | Contacts: Content - Kerry Magruder, Website - Eric Bruning